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Thread: ***How to COMPLETELY customize your mags trigger*** warning:picture intensive

  1. #1
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    ***How to COMPLETELY customize your mags trigger*** warning:picture intensive

    Ok...well, I said in one of the picture threads that I would get to making a thread on this, so here we go!

    I first customized the trigger on my Z-grip, and it came out very nice. I know I wanted to do that on my second mag w/ Intelliframe, and I also wanted to document it. So what you are about to see is a (for the most part) step by step process into customizing your mags trigger, to modifying it to take out the slack, and to shape it to how you desire. There are many pictures

    Before continuing, please note:

    This was not an easy project, as I myself messed up quite a bit. You could very easily ruin your trigger. It is completely your responsibility to not screw up or hurt yourself.

    Now, with that out of the way, please read everything before busting out a hammer and some files and thinking that 15 minutes later, you'll have a new trigger
    Last edited by Dave; 10-05-2003 at 05:51 PM.

  2. #2
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    First, you need to tap out the trigger pin. Put some tape (preferable electric) over the right side, and tap it out.
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  3. #3
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    you might have to dis-assemble your mag to get the trigger out.
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  4. #4
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    You now put the pin in the trigger, outside of the mag.
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    Last edited by Dave; 10-05-2003 at 05:52 PM.

  5. #5
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    now place the assembly in a vise.
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  6. #6
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    now, wrap a rubber band tightly around the two ends of the pin sticking out. The tolerances of the diameter of the trigger pin hole are slightly larger than the diameter of the trigger pin itself. The idea is to reduce the difference between the two tolerances so you can have a tighter trigger group!! What the rubber band does is pull the pin to one wall in the trigger pin hole, so all the gapping is moved to one place. Also, if you don't hold the trigger pin down, when you go to tap on the trigger, the pin vibrates around, (in theory) messing up the contact and displacement of aluminum by micro-richocheting off the inside of the trigger pin hole. You get the same effect if you try to slam a basketball on the ground and try to not make it not bounce, in one try.
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  7. #7
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    Now, this is most MOST IMPORTANT STEP. Everything matters here, from the type of hammer (ball peen), hammer weight, hammer stroke, etc. The problem, is reducing the amound of aluminum that makes up the trigger pin hole, so it will wrap around the trigger pin more snugly, and give you a tighter trigger group. The interesting part, is when you realize...tapping this part of the trigger essentially does nothing except move the aluminum around to the other sides. So in fact, you still have the problem, because now instead of the hole just being slightly larger than the trigger pin, you've hammered it into an oval shape around the trigger pin, with gaps on both sides.

    How do you overcome this? Very VERY delicately, and precisely. This is not a 5 minute modification. You need to do this when you have a good 4 hours to work with, because to do this right, you have to put some metalwork skills to the test.

    Now, here is the trick...if the metal just keeps moving around, and having the same gap, what do you do? Simple...you just keep delicately hammering the 'gap' right over to the bottom of the pin hole, where all the 'meat' of the trigger is. That way, since the actual trigger is there, and the the metal isn't just 2mm thin, it simply can't just make another gap...the metal has to move into the bottom metal.
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    Last edited by Dave; 10-05-2003 at 05:53 PM.

  8. #8
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    now, it is critical to stop every few hammer hits to check to see where the metal is moving, if your hammering equally on both sides, whether your shearing off the edges of the pin hole w/ your trigger, where the gap is going, and how tight or loose the trigger pin still feels.

    Now, be VERY careful. That little flat spot where the top of the trigger meets the underside of the trigger frame (where the top magnet in an Emag trigger is)...can be damaged VERY VERY easily. Just a simple hammer blow to it can knock a whole corner of it out of alighnment, and you have to break out the files, which gets crazy if you don't have a good way to file it perfectly flat like it was CNC machined. Ask me how I know I had to spend two hours repairing this trigger because I hit the top flat part of it so many times w/ a hammer, and it was VERY hard to get back aligned w/ the underside of the trigger frame/guard.

    As you can see in the picture, the left corner of the flat part of the top of the trigger was damaged. (note to self: don't do that again )
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    Last edited by Dave; 10-05-2003 at 05:56 PM.

  9. #9
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    Don't worry about the metal spreading out, it will do that.

    Now, how do you get the metal 'gap' moving to the underside of the trigger? A ball peen hammer won't cut it...it won't get in close enough. You have to use a punch, and hammer the trigger with a punch to move the metal around, and tighten up the trigger pin hole ring.

    The trigger looks pretty ugly right now...thats ok!
    Also, as you go along, you can eventually take off the rubber band to guage the tightness of the pin in regards to the hole. Spray it w/ some lubricant every once and a while.

    Note: DON'T slam it w/ the hammer while the pin is out!! baaaaaad idea!
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  10. #10
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    Now, when you are just about satisfied w/ how the pin feels in regards to the hole, check for any gaps by holding a light source behind it and looking at the trigger pin hole area from a side view. If it still has gaps, you need to work the metal punch a little more and move that top ring metal around to the bottom until there is at least 80% contact w/ the pin (a little gap is ok.

    Now, take out the pin, and take the trigger out of the vise. Get a very very fine metal file, and begin to take of the sides of the trigger pin hole where the metal got smooshed out by the hammer (it is inevitable)

    WARNING: Don't file too much, or you will do what I did, and filed off too much (oh great!) and it will probably be at the wrong angle, and then you will have to spend more time correcting the flatness of it in regard to the other side. bad bad!!! lol

    In the picture, you can see the 'bright' area where the arrows are pointed to...this is the part you carefully, file to a rough flattened stage. Next, you bring out some honing stones, and do the really fine precise work on a stone. Sorry, I was too busy correcting my trigger to remember to take pictures of this part
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  11. #11
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    Now, you are ready to shape your trigger. But! Very important: Make sure you are TOTALLY done w/ the trigger pin hole before you procede to filing down the trigger, because the stock, flat sides of the trigger are the only correct tolerances you have when you are honing, filing, putting in a vise, measuring, or, as in my case, correcting. If you start filing down the trigger before this work is done, sure your trigger now has a pretty angle, but you have nothing to go by as far as your 'control'.

    Anyways, here is how my trigger was shaping up after 4 hours
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  12. #12
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    Here is the trigger polished. I used a variety of files for shaping it, and used sandpaper and a buffing wheel to smooth it out. Then, used some Never Dull to roughtly buff it, and finished it up w/ some Brasso.
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  13. #13
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    This is the end result. I also used a brass washer as a spacer between the trigger and the trigger frame, but snythetic washers can also be used. I am quite happy with the outcome of it.
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  14. #14
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    Great tutorial. Has me debating in trying it myself.


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  15. #15
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    Metal shrinking 101!

    Very cool I doubt I would have thought of that!

  16. #16
    CrazyLad Guest
    woa that looks really cool

  17. #17
    xrancid_milkx Guest
    Plan on selling that trigger anytime soon ?????


  18. #18
    paintballfreak1527 Guest
    nice trigger job

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