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Thread: Classic 68 Automag

  1. #1

    Classic 68 Automag

    Hey guys,

    I have a practically brand new Classic 68 Automag w/ the sheridan expansion chamber in front of the trigger (nice mini handle). I havent used it in 10 years but im back in the game. I plan on cleaning the gun w/oil and I do have the parts kit I will change out all the seals. The Gun was only used less than 10 times.

    My question is right now I have 3 old CO2 tanks, I was thinking of using N2 or HPA, is my gun able to accept the N2 or HPA without any mods?

    Also I have an air compressor I use for house projects, is there a kit I can get to be able to fill my own bottles?

    Please let me know what tanks/brands are good these days.

    Thanks,
    Anthony

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Yes, you can use HPA. The bottles usually output at a regulated 850psi which is the same as CO2 so they are a direct replacement. Just make sure you get a high (850psi) output tank and not a low (450psi) output tank.

    You won't be able to fill your own tanks. Most home compressors only output up to about 125 - 150 psi. You need to be able to fill your bottles to 3000 or 4500 psi which can only be done with heavy duty industrial compressors that are very expensive. If you want to keep your own air around you can have a reserve by using a scuba tank and a scuba fill station. You will be able to get several near fills with a scuba tank and they only cost between $5 - $10 to get filled at a dive shop.

    Crossfire is a good brand of HPA regulator. I have a couple of Pure Energy regulator. They aren't as good as the Crossfire, but I haven't had any issues with them keeping up to any of my guns. Any bottle will do as long as its carbon fibre which makes it light and tough.

    When you clean the gun, make sure the oil you use is non-petroleum based synthetic oil so it won't eat the orings. I use a good light synthetic airtool oil and haven't had problems in years.

    You might want to consider upgrading your valve to level 10 which a bolt upgrade. It will prevent chops, so you won't have to worry about cleaning out your barrel near as often. If you do this upgrade you will most likely also have to upgrade your regulator piston assembly because your original one is set to a lower safety release pressure than level 10 guns operate at.
    Except for the Automag in front, its usually the man behind the equipment that counts.

  3. #3
    Thanks for the info! That was a huge help!

    Besides the Level 10 upgrade is there any barrel upgrades around for my gun? I went on the websites that used to make barrels for my gun (DYE) and they no longer have the automag on there due to its age.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
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    You can pick up all sorts of twistlock barrels for automags in the classified sections of many forums. They sell really cheap because many people using mags now use the ULE body which uses cocker threaded barrels.

  5. #5
    Dumb question but do CO2 tanks have an expire date? I have 2 tanks that are 10 years old.

    Was looking into buying new CO2 tanks or actually upgrading to a nitro bottle. I havent convinced myself yet that spending the $$ on a carbon fiber nitro is really worth it, im a weekend player, no tourneys yet. If i do get a nitro tank I dont want anything big, I have played with 20oz tanks and after a while it gets bulky. maybe 45ci 4500psi??? the aluminum bottles are tempting b/c of there price, not their weight.

    Looking for your input!

  6. #6
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    CO2 tanks that are larger than 2-1/2" in diameter need to be hydro tested like HPA tanks. Tanks 2-1/2" or under only need to be in good visual condition to pass a visual inspection. I believe there is a 20 year life expectancy on these tanks.

  7. #7
    co2 bottles usually expire after 5 years if im not mistaken, then they need to be hydroed but it is acutally cheaper too buy new tanks and use the old ones as pencil holders. (make sure there completely empty before you cut the top off)

    also to make sure you get a bottle large enough for your style of play you can use the rule for 3000psi multiply the ci by 10 and for 4500psi multiply the ci by 15, this is just a ballpark # but if you usually shoot a bag of paint a game a 45 4500 will do you but if you play longer games, shoot more, or dont want to have to fill up as often you might want a 68 4500 tank but just thought id put that out there for you.
    Last edited by paintball72; 05-15-2008 at 07:11 PM. Reason: to add

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by paintball72
    co2 bottles usually expire after 5 years if im not mistaken, then they need to be hydroed but it is acutally cheaper too buy new tanks and use the old ones as pencil holders. (make sure there completely empty before you cut the top off)
    Only the ones larger than 2-1/2" in diameter need to be rehydroed. Usually anything 16oz of below does not need to be hydro tested, as they are less than 2-1/2 inches.

    Yes, unfortunately it is quite often cheaper to replace the tanks than to have them rehydroed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    actually for Co2 tanks the rule is 2 and 2
    2 in or under diameter and less than 2 ft long
    about the only Co2 tanks that dont need hydro are 3.5/4 oz or older 7 oz tanks

  10. #10
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    When I took my 12oz tank in for a hydro test at Grinnel (they are a national professional tank inspection and testing agency), they said it didn't need it because it was only 2-1/2 inches in diameter.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Honestly, you might not even need to change the seals. I'd just put some oil in the asa and dry fire it several times to seat the reg and run the oil through.
    My feedback

    Made in USA - it matters.

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