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Thread: What kind of permanent damage can CO2 do to an rt valve?

  1. #1

    What kind of permanent damage can CO2 do to an rt valve?

    I'm going to be buying some rt valves off a guy, and I'm concerned he used co2 on them. What kind if permanent damage that cannot be fixed can this do? Or does it just kill the o rings? O rings aren't an issue, I got a ton. If it does do permanent damage, what should I look for to see if he used co2 on them?

  2. #2
    If liquid from the co2 got in them it could tarnish up the brass stuff, seals are probably all shot, maybe condensation in the reg spring area in the back. You wont know till you get em and check them out really. Nothing would be permanent though, just good cleaning and seals/oil/grease. Thats the good thing about stainless and aluminum

  3. #3
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    CO2 freezes the orings due to the condensation that forms because of the high rate of charge. All that happens, is you can't control the pressure or stop the gas from flowing through the valve when this happens. It can deform the orings due to blow-by, but it won't hurt the valve.
    Except for the Automag in front, its usually the man behind the equipment that counts.

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    World will come to an end...and then you die....forever living out eternity in hell...smelling Ty's farts and motor-boating Beamers man boobs. You've been warned.


    The worst thing that'll happen is you'll need to replace the red oring on the PT housing. You'll either need to send it to AGD/Tuna or if you have the know how, can do it yourself but you'll still need to get the oring.

    You can run Co2 through a X-valve. I wouldn't play a game with it but for testing purposes (leaks...etc.), no worries. No more then a few shots a second.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ando View Post
    The worst thing that'll happen is you'll need to replace the red oring on the PT housing.
    This oring typically won't be a problem because it is permanently compressed. CO2 won't be passing by one of the sealing surfaces. Therefore, that sealing surface won't freeze and prevent it from becoming a good seal again. It is typically orings that have a plunger or moving part that seals against them that are the problem. When CO2 condenses on them and becomes liquid, they freeze and can't properly seal against further CO2 flow.

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