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Thread: broke-off CCM fitting in my X-valve, what shoud i do?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by athomas View Post
    You can remove the broken extractor using an annodize process. Take the valve completely apart so that only the section with the broken piece is remaining. Mix up a 3:1 ratio of battery acid to water and put it in a plastic tray. Put a piece of aluminum inside the tray on the bottom. This piece of aluminum has to have an aluminum wire running out of the solution. If you have a plastic grate to sit on the aluminum on the bottom of the tray, it would be great. Connect a +12V computer power supply line to the valve section using aluminum wire or rod. Make sure there is a good electrical connection or it won't work. An aluminum rod threaded into the valve at the field strip screw hole might be the way to go. Run a tap in first so that any annodize in the threads is removed. Put the valve into the solution so that it is completely covered. Connect the 12 negative lead to the wire/rod connected to the aluminum on the bottom of the tray. Turn on the power supply and watch the bubbles coming from the ferrous metals. You might have to make waves near the bubble area to allow the bubbles to release from the metal which will allow new acid to come in contact with the area. After a few minutes, the ferrous metals will be totally dissolved.
    You will probably need a wire actually touching that broken steel. That looks like JB weld holding the brass piece in. That would explain the difficulties. With ano'ed aluminum, teflon tape, and JB weld, your connection to the steel will not last long if you get any connection through the body. The process will partially strip your ano eventually.

    I have actually drilled out a screw, thought I was just chasing the threads with a tap, and broke the tap a few turns from the end. I never figured out what had been used to hold that screw in. A strong glue in the threads seems stronger than most tools you can fit in there. You may need to drill the entire hole and "patch" it again.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spider-TW View Post
    You will probably need a wire actually touching that broken steel. That looks like JB weld holding the brass piece in. That would explain the difficulties. With ano'ed aluminum, teflon tape, and JB weld, your connection to the steel will not last long if you get any connection through the body. The process will partially strip your ano eventually.

    I have actually drilled out a screw, thought I was just chasing the threads with a tap, and broke the tap a few turns from the end. I never figured out what had been used to hold that screw in. A strong glue in the threads seems stronger than most tools you can fit in there. You may need to drill the entire hole and "patch" it again.
    As long as a piece of the brass is touching any raw aluminum, the process will work. If not, then jam a piece of aluminum wire down beside the broken metal and attach the power supply to that point.

    The process won't hurt the aluminum valve or strip the anodize. It is the anodize process. If anything, it will strengthen any weak or exposed anodize areas. It will however, kill any other metals that can't grow a protective oxide layer.
    Except for the Automag in front, its usually the man behind the equipment that counts.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by athomas View Post
    As long as a piece of the brass is touching any raw aluminum, the process will work. If not, then jam a piece of aluminum wire down beside the broken metal and attach the power supply to that point.

    The process won't hurt the aluminum valve or strip the anodize. It is the anodize process. If anything, it will strengthen any weak or exposed anodize areas. It will however, kill any other metals that can't grow a protective oxide layer.
    It messed up my part's ano. For good reason I believe. The ano crystal structure is non-conductive (that actually being a verification of ano layer). After dying, the ano is sealed with the dye in the pores (which allowed ion transfers during ano process). The sealed layer is fully non-conductive. The ano bath actually eats ano layer, the process just normally builds faster than it dissolves, up to the max layer thickness. With a dyed part, the top of each pore sits there until the acid eats it away, and then starts penetrating into the pores. This eats out the dye in the pore and continues to dissolve the layer until there is enough transfer to start building oxide again. You will still have ano, but no color or seal layer left.

  4. #34
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    though the above mentioned DIY battery acid solution could work, i will still say that a machine stop is the way to go and if they are competent, then you won't have to worry about the anno, or baths, or power supplies, or anything else. you drop it off, and in a day or so(the times are dependent on if they have jobs scheduled or not), and it clear of the problem.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spider-TW View Post
    It messed up my part's ano. For good reason I believe. The ano crystal structure is non-conductive (that actually being a verification of ano layer). After dying, the ano is sealed with the dye in the pores (which allowed ion transfers during ano process). The sealed layer is fully non-conductive. The ano bath actually eats ano layer, the process just normally builds faster than it dissolves, up to the max layer thickness. With a dyed part, the top of each pore sits there until the acid eats it away, and then starts penetrating into the pores. This eats out the dye in the pore and continues to dissolve the layer until there is enough transfer to start building oxide again. You will still have ano, but no color or seal layer left.
    This shouldn't happen using sulfuric acid in the proper mix values. You can leave the aluminum cathodes or any aluminum in an anodize bath and it won't hurt them. Now, try that with muriatic acid or hydrochloric acid and the aluminum will disappear quite quickly.

    I've used this process for removing tiny broken steel bits out of aluminum a few times. It works quite well without any damage to the aluminum part.

  6. #36
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    did you get tha broken CCM fitting out? if yes, how?

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by need4reebs View Post
    did you get tha broken CCM fitting out? if yes, how?
    Luke is inspecting it right now.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by djinnform View Post
    Luke is inspecting it right now.
    I'm glad you're getting some help on this issue. Are you still going to use CCM fittings in the future; or has this experience left a sour taste in your mouth?

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by TyeStick View Post
    I'm glad you're getting some help on this issue. Are you still going to use CCM fittings in the future; or has this experience left a sour taste in your mouth?
    I must admit, that I'm not a master of Teflon tape. So, there could be some fault of mine here. I've got the CCM's on my #1 Tuna EMAX Valve and ASA and they are holding tight, but I'm never going to try to take them off at this point and risk destroying the Tuna Valve. I've removed them from all my other MAGS, because they leak and drive me frickin insane, unless I crank them in so tight, to the point of breaking off!

  10. #40
    I found that I couldn't torque a CCM fitting in all the way on my X-valve in my E-Tac, otherwise the macro side wouldn't clear the Tac body. The fittings are just slightly smaller than a normal macro fitting. But some blue loctite did the trick, holding the fitting at the correct depth and providing a perfect seal. Maybe I was just lucky with mine, but it has worked flawlessly.

  11. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by djinnform View Post
    I must admit, that I'm not a master of Teflon tape. So, there could be some fault of mine here. I've got the CCM's on my #1 Tuna EMAX Valve and ASA and they are holding tight, but I'm never going to try to take them off at this point and risk destroying the Tuna Valve. I've removed them from all my other MAGS, because they leak and drive me frickin insane, unless I crank them in so tight, to the point of breaking off!
    I suggest using 'Ninja threading tape'. I use it on all my CCM fittings, and I've never had a leak.
    It's thicker, seals better, and gives the overall appearance a cleaner look than white teflon tape.

    (Click Here --->Ninja Tape)

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
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    I got the busted parts out.
    The reason your EZout broke is becuase you didn't take into consideration of the EZout taper to hole size and hole depth. You actually destroyed the regulator valve pin assembly by screwing the EZout into it bottoming out and busting the EZout.

    Probably should ease off some on the tightening of these parts, I actually had to put the valve halves into a vise and use pliers to twist them apart.

    All in all, the valve is fine and all you need is a new air fitting and the regulator valve pin assembly. (#30)

    I'll send you an invoice...

    Last edited by luke; 11-16-2013 at 09:51 PM.

  13. #43
    The day is saved! Thank you Luke.

  14. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by RT Lover View Post
    Dude email Luke, he does all the mag work and probably can fix it at a low cost opposed to just a shop, he has all u need I bet

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