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Thread: What is a velocity lock for?

  1. #1
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    What is a velocity lock for?

    Yes, ha-ha, for locking down the velocity adjuster. I ask because the classic adjuster doesn't seem to need any 'locking down'. It's a small, smooth screw, with very little surface to get purchase on. Were they "just because" kinds of things, or would they still be required today if someone used a classic mag in a tournament? Why don't the RT and descendant valves use them? I know the RT velocity adjuster is larger in diameter.

  2. #2
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    the purpose of it was to be able to adjust your velocity without an 1/8 allen. easier. but for tourny's they wanted to make sure you couldnt do it on the field so they put a lock on it

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  3. #3
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    So the velocity lock ring clamps to the velocity adjuster? The LAPCO adjuster would make more sense if that was the case.

  4. #4
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    true but when mags were popular everyone and their momma made a thumb adjust and everyone had to be different

  5. #5
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    Good old turney lock. From a time when tournaments were held in the woods. And people had time to cheat with FPS.

  6. #6
    yep, the good old days.

  7. #7
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    If you shut off the air pressure going to the valve, you can manually turn the classic velocity adjuster using just your fingers. That made it easy to cheat in the field during tournaments.

    The old velocity locking rings screwed over the threads on the velocity adjuster and tightened against the back of the valve effectively locking the adjuster tightly in place. Some locking adjusters were complete replacements for the stock adjuster and had larger thumb wheels instead of allen key holes. Those adjusters used locking allen screws to prevent field adjustment without tools. Others had replacement adjusters that had a smaller diameter so that a protective cap would cover the adjuster to prevent field adjustment.

    The retro valves were designed with an oring providing tension on the adjuster, so that you always needed tools to adjust the velocity.

    Most fields aren't knowledgeable about mags, so I doubt many refs even know that a classic mag can be velocity adjusted in the field without tools. To be legal though, you do need to have a velocity lock on the adjuster of a classic mag.
    Except for the Automag in front, its usually the man behind the equipment that counts.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by athomas View Post

    Most fields aren't knowledgeable about mags, so I doubt many refs even know that a classic mag can be velocity adjusted in the field without tools. To be legal though, you do need to have a velocity lock on the adjuster of a classic mag.
    Oh how times have changed. Then again I'm betting no newer field has a clue how to legally chroney an RT. So basically anyone with an rt could run hot shots if they wanted to.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackdeath1k View Post
    Oh how times have changed. Then again I'm betting no newer field has a clue how to legally chroney an RT. So basically anyone with an rt could run hot shots if they wanted to.
    I never had to do a proper chronograph reading for my emag when I was using it in tournaments in the early 2000's.

    I remember back in the 90's when the refs used to check all the guns really closely, and knew the cheats that were available. You had to have a tournament lock on the mags (before retros), and you had to have a beavertail on a cocker.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by athomas View Post
    If you shut off the air pressure going to the valve, you can manually turn the classic velocity adjuster using just your fingers. That made it easy to cheat in the field during tournaments.

    The old velocity locking rings screwed over the threads on the velocity adjuster and tightened against the back of the valve effectively locking the adjuster tightly in place. Some locking adjusters were complete replacements for the stock adjuster and had larger thumb wheels instead of allen key holes. Those adjusters used locking allen screws to prevent field adjustment without tools. Others had replacement adjusters that had a smaller diameter so that a protective cap would cover the adjuster to prevent field adjustment.

    The retro valves were designed with an oring providing tension on the adjuster, so that you always needed tools to adjust the velocity.

    Most fields aren't knowledgeable about mags, so I doubt many refs even know that a classic mag can be velocity adjusted in the field without tools. To be legal though, you do need to have a velocity lock on the adjuster of a classic mag.
    Thanks.

    I recall some of my e-friends having chrono refs hold magnets to their grip panels to check for full-auto functionality. You could wire up a FA circuit triggered by a hall switch, then sew a magnet into one glove. Chrono/verify semi-auto action with left hand, shoot tournament with right hand.

  11. #11
    Anyone familiar with this tourney lock/cap? It was difficult to get apart someone had red loctite and the oring inside was toast. I had to hear it up to get it apart but now I don't know what size oring goes in there




  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by river031403 View Post
    Anyone familiar with this tourney lock/cap? It was difficult to get apart someone had red loctite and the oring inside was toast. I had to hear it up to get it apart but now I don't know what size oring goes in there
    That's the AGD lock for rental valves. Could not (easily) be adjusted by the renters.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by MAGgot View Post
    That's the AGD lock for rental valves. Could not (easily) be adjusted by the renters.
    Very cool to know. Valve seems to be normal no rental scribed or lazered on it. I just need to find an oring for the locking nut,the one that was in it is toast

  14. #14
    A local field owner has a bunch of rentals he bought from Tom and they weren't lasered as rental valves either. Not sure when/why some were labeled as rental.

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