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Thread: Movement vs BPS

  1. #1
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    Movement vs BPS

    I started playing in 1989 till about the early 2000s. Just got back into paintball last year when my nephew got into playing. I wish I could go back in time and slap the pro-shop guy that talked me out of buying an automag or an autococker for a VM-68. The mark up on that marker most have been enormous because he pushed it really hard and I took the bait. He said why would you want to buy an autococker or an automag? Both markers are pumps that were modified to shoot semi. You should buy this instead; a marker that was designed to be a semi. Ugh!!!! I bought my first mag last year and now I know exactly how much I missed out back then. Now I own 3 mags. So I guess I've made up for lost time.

    Enough of that. One of the biggest things that I have noticed since coming back is the lack of tactical movement. There are some exceptions. Most games that I see have everyone running for a bunker and for the most part they stay in that bunker and shoot it out with the other side. They seem to depend more on BPS instead of getting a better angle. Maybe "back in the day" when BPS was low, most of us learned how to out maneuver our opponents. When my friend and I get together and I have someone that can give good covering fire, we work the angles and get the shots. This is usually with woodsball. Speedball is a little better with movement. However, if given the choice between the two, I'd prefer woodsball. I've played in Indiana, Ohio and Michigan this last year and have seen similar trends. Does anyone else notice this? I can't be the only one. Maybe its regional?

  2. #2
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    that may be what you see recreationally, but that is not what high end tournaments are. most are the exact opposite, too fast. lane someone off the break, and then run down the field shooting.

    locally, yeah ROF typically changes the movement game. most new players learn to live behind the gun, and are enamored with shooting fast. as that fades more players learn to move smarter. movement for the sake of it, is still ridiculous. learning to read a field and move smart is totally different, something that comes from experience. these new players that love ROF are typically junk and are easily eliminated, so i don't worry about them much.

    newbies playing pump tend to lead to lots of motion, because its easier. but playing pump tournaments tends to slow it back down, as the shooting skill increases, the movement decreases.

    TLDR: has to do with the firepower and experience of the group you are playing with.
    Last edited by cockerpunk; 02-17-2014 at 04:02 PM.
    loose cars and fast women

  3. #3
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    Nah. Your right on. I played from 94ish till the end of 02. Started with pump. Then a prolite. Then a 68automag. Up until around 99-2000 it was tactical strategy and working as a team. Once the mouse click era came in though......... I quit then mainly because I got sick of being at the field and playing against a hand full of kids that showed up with a blank check for paint. And just shot till they were out. And if you shot them. Heaven forbid. Gun goes flying and them ranting how you cheated. It got old. And I got burnt out. Started playing again at the start of last year. The groups I've played with want the firepower. But want to use tactical strategy to go with it. So I've lucked out. But standard mainstream appears to still be dead on with what you have seen.

    On the plus side. An RT that was locked away for 10 years still holds its own against the new age mouse clickers. And only cost 20 bux to get it running top notch again.

  4. #4
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    a lot of it stems from the fact that no one has shown the younger players how to move or when to move and how fields DON'T set up fields to encourage movement. its an easier concept of get to position 1 and shoot out of it till there is no one left. they don't know about angles and position, or how to shoot into a position and when to keep your head down.

    as for the VM and the old proshop. well, that VM was decent for the time, and though mags and cockers were more expensive, and the mag was never a pump first; the VM was probably sitting there longer, and needed to be moved, since the parts and the support were dying.

    but like you said, you're using a mag now and making up for lost time.

  5. #5
    As a player that played his first commercially run game in 90, I find the current mainstream paintball games influenced by three factors:

    Increasing BPS: This tends to intimidate newer folks and it allows for more effective suppression, and compensates for the inability to aim.

    Field format, or more specifically, the smaller field size: This tends to eliminate or reduce any significant surprise or flanking actions, keeping the game in a more linear head to head situation.

    The placement of bunkers every 10-15ft in every direction (unless you're at the tape of course): This allows players who take the initiative to close with their opponents or even bunker him/her.

    The net result is that the game favors those who can:
    Snapshoot
    Work angles (i.e. push up one side to shoot crossfield)
    Communicate (to coordinate pinching actions and maintaining situational awareness)

    The problem is that these factors didn't start in the woods but, they've since spilled over and now, most woodsball games are really just speedball in the woods.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cockerpunk View Post
    that may be what you see recreationally, but that is not what high end tournaments are. most are the exact opposite, too fast. lane someone off the break, and then run down the field shooting.
    I didn't mean to include tournament players in my assessment. Although I don't like speedball, I've actually had some fun playing recently when forced to play indoors. Experienced speedball players are very tactical. I learned I wasn't keeping quite as tight as I thought I was when playing against some good players.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by uv_halo View Post

    Field format, or more specifically, the smaller field size: This tends to eliminate or reduce any significant surprise or flanking actions, keeping the game in a more linear head to head situation.
    Yes! I have seen that a lot of fields have gotten smaller. Back in the early 90s I mostly played at Fox River Games near Plainfield Illinois. They had some REALLY big fields, especially on the back half of their property. Games lasted 20-30mins back then too. If you got shot out quickly, the wait time was a little annoying but it also gave you time to gas up/gear up too. One of my first games since coming back was at Fort Knox in Knox Indiana. They have some really nice themed fields. The owner and his employees are super friendly. It was the first field that I've ever been to that offers to buy back any unused paint (as long as its still in an unopened bag). I can't stress how much I enjoyed my experience there. However, most of their fields are small. Small enough that the opposing team could see us and re-position on the break if we decided to flood one side. Although I doubt Fort Knox has the 128 acres (I think) that Fox River has to work with.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fstop_22 View Post
    Yes! I have seen that a lot of fields have gotten smaller.
    This guy wins the internet for today!

    I miss the enormous fields and 20 on 20 games

    "I'm not happy unless you're not happy"

  9. #9
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    Fox still runs big games for open play.
    In general the size of fields and the style of play has "shrunk".
    That is a whole story of it's own as to why.
    However, Fox still runs the good old fashioned woodsball games for all to enjoy. The BPS limit is 10 and rate of fire is semi only.
    You can still have fun even playing with a pump gun in those games!

    Sandman

  10. #10
    I started playing around 04-05 with a pmi hornet when a lot of the kids were using higher end electros. When I walked on to the field, the agglets looked at my pump and scoffed. That was until the game was over. Now I have 12 electros and 5 or 6 mechs. Most of my electros are Indian creek designs and none has a clue what I'm playing with, my mini, and ion usually sit at home unless I need to loan them out. I have a vm68 to and it was a blast to play with when it worked(needs a rebuild).

    I have more "kills" with my pump and Tiberius t8 than anything in my collection. I think I can thank my start in pump play for technique rather than rof. Plus I love walking on to the field and running with a tippmann rental(when I'm traveling) and ruining the electro guys fun. I can't wait to run my warp feed mini mag when the season starts.

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